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Tel : 028 94 429844

AYICC, 10a High Street,

Antrim, BT41 4AN
antrimcc@btconnect.com

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Monday : 9am - 4:30pm
Tuesday : 9am - 8:30pm

Wednesday : 9am - 4:30pm

Thursday : 9am - 8:30pm

Friday : 9am - 3pm 

Sat & Sun : Sunday Closed 

 

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Antrim Youth Information & Counselling Centre is supported by

Antrim Youth Information & Counselling Centre (AYICC) has received support from the Victims Support Programme for Groups working with Victims and Survivors, which is administered by VSS on behalf of the Office of the First and Deputy First Minister.

Company Limited by Guarantee (NI 057249) and recognised by The Charity Commission for NI (NIC102200)

© 2019 AYICC / Website Disclaimer - Created by William Smyth by Design

PARENTAL INFORMATION

Just the fact that a substance is sold as legal, doesn’t mean that it’s safe - you can’t be sure what’s in a ‘legal high’ that you have been given or taken and what effect it’s likely to have on you.

Individuals using drugs try to conceal their symptoms and downplay their problems.

 

If you are worried that a family member or friend might  be using drugs
 

look out for the following signs below.

 

1.       Changes in physical appearance

2.       Sudden mood swings, irritability or angry outbursts

3.       Engaging in secretive or suspicious behaviours

4.       Drop in attendance and performance at school/work

5.       Stealing - Unexplained need for money

6.       Sudden weight loss or gain

7.       Irregular sleeping/eating patterns

8.       Lack of motivation, or appearing lethargic

9.       Unexplained change in personality or attitude

10.     Bloodshot eyes, pupils larger or smaller than usual

TOUGH QUESTIONS

Young people tend to ask the same questions about drinking and there are two vital things you need to keep in mind: 

 

If you don’t talk to them they will go somewhere else with their questions about alcohol and what they learn may not be helpful.

It’s perfectly OK to say “I don’t know” or “I haven’t thought about that yet” or “That makes me feel uncomfortable or embarrassed.” 


You don’t have to be the one with all the answers when it comes to talking to your child about underage drinking.

All you have to do is to be the one they come to with most of the questions.

A DOCTORS POINT OF VIEW

Dr Sarah Jarvis discusses these risks from a GP’s perspective.

 

SOME MORE SIGNS TO LOOK OUT FOR

In order to keep track of where your child is, you should ask questions like:

 

  • what company they are keeping

  • who the parents, guardians or carers of their friends are

  • why they are always late home

  • why they do not want to get up in the morning

  • why they are not eating

  • whether they are missing school

  • why they lock their bedroom door

  • why they have so much money and where did it come from

  • what they are doing when they are out

 

Ask these questions in a caring way. They should not show distrust and a lack of confidence in your child and always keep lines of communication open at all times.

THIS PROJECT HAS BEEN MADE POSSIBLE THROUGH FUNDING UNDER THE DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE AND ANTRIM & NEWTOWNABBEY PCSP